The Story of Television – 1956 RCA Educational Documentary – WDTVLIVE42

The Radio Corporation of America (RCA) traces scientific advances related the development of television from the 1920’s to 1950’s, including the introduction of color broadcasts. The film includes technical examples of how televisions work, and notable broadcasts from TV’s early days.

The film is very much a showpiece for advances made by RCA, glossing over or omitting details of competing television standards from other manufacturers. .
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WDTVLIVE42 – Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past – newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.

Electronic Computers And Applied Mathematics - 1961 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

Early 1960’s look at how computers can be used to assist with complex mathematical problems. Binary logic & arithmetic used by computers is explained. Many scenes of large mainframe computers (the circa 1958 RCA 501 transistorized “Data Processing System” is featured), tape storage devices, card readers, impact printers, operator consoles, and computer scientists.

Some interesting background information about the RCA501 can be found at http://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings/afips/1958/5053/00/50530160.pdf

WDTVLIVE42 – Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past – newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.
Video Rating: / 5

Now See:

The History of Television, 1942 to 2000.

history of television

The History of Television, 1942 to 2000. Albert Abramson published (with McFarland) in 1987 a landmark volume titled The History of Television, 1880-1941. This second volume, 1942 to 2000, covers the significant developments of new cameras and picture tubes (making commercial television possible worldwide), the invention of the video tape recorder (allowing editing, re-shooting and rebroadcasting) and much more. Chapters are devoted to television and World War II and the postwar era, the development of color television, Ampex Corporation’s contributions, television in Europe, the change from helical to high band technology, solid state cameras, the television coverage of Apollo II, the rise of electronic journalism, television entering the studios, the introduction of the camcorder, the demise of RCA at the hands of GE, the domination of Sony and Matsushita, and the future of television in e-cinema and the 1080 P24 format. The book is heavily illustrated (as is the first volume).

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